aluminumcasting-news

Surface treatment of Aluminum Alloy

Surface treatment systems are applied to aluminum die castings to provide a decorative finish, to form a protective barrier against environmental exposure, and to improve resistance to wear. Decorative finishes can be applied to aluminum die castings through painting, powder coat finishing, polishing, epoxy finishing, and plating. Aluminum can be plated by applying an initial […]

Read More »

Aluminum Alloy Choice

What you should consider when doing the aluminum alloy achoice? Choosing the alloy, casting process and thermal treatment requires a knowledge of the service conditions of the part under consideration. More than 60 casting alloys are in use today, with up to five different thermal treatment options. This results in a large number of alternatives […]

Read More »

Anodizing of Aluminum Alloy

The electrolytic oxidation of aluminum is known as anodizing, by electrolyzing suitably prepared aluminum in an acid solution (typically sulfuric or chromic acid), the surface layer of the aluminum can be converted to a coating with protective, decorative or functional properties. The coating formed is analogous to a honeycomb and will accept dyes of different […]

Read More »

NDT: PT& RT

Normally, we can provide the following NDT test for the aluminum castings. PT – Dye Penetrant Testing The dye penetrant testing can be used to locate discontinuities on material surfaces. A highly penetrating dye on the surface will enter discontinuities after a sufficient penetration time, and after removing the excess dye with a developing agent, […]

Read More »

Alloy Designations

Aluminum casting alloys in the U.S. are numbered according to a three-digit (plus decimal) system adopted by the Aluminum Assn. (AA) in 1954 and approved by the American National Standards Institute in 1957 (ANSI H35.1). The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and the Federal and Military specifications […]

Read More »

aluminumcasting-china

WHY CASTING?   Metal casting process begins by creating a mold, which is the ‘reverse’ shape of the part we need. The mold is made  from a refractory  material, for example, sand. The metal is heated in an oven until it melts, and the molten metal is  poured into the mould cavity. The liquid takes the shape of cavity, which is the shape of the part. It is cooled until it solidifies. Finally, the solidified metal part is removed from the mould. A large number of metal components in designs we use every day are made by casting. The reasons for this include: (a) Casting can produce very complex geometry parts with internal cavities and hollow sections. (b) It can be used to make small (few hundred grams) to very large size parts (thousands of kilograms) (c) It is economical, with very little wastage: the extra metal in each casting is re-melted and re-used (d) Cast metal is isotropic – it has the same physical/mechanical properties along any direction.

Read More »